Massachusetts Legal Developments Blog

Massachusetts Legal Developments Blog

Massachusetts Breathalyzer Drama Comes to an End

The ongoing drama involving faulty breathalyzer tests in the Commonwealth may see an end with a victory for some and defeat for others. The journey to this point has been a statewide saga involving law enforcement, defendants, attorneys, prosecutors, and the court. Here is some background to bring you up to speed on this evolving issue that impacts so many people facing OUI/DUI charges in Massachusetts.

In 2011, Massachusetts introduced a new breath-test machine called the Alcotest 9510. The device was manufactured by Draeger Safety Diagnostics Inc. of Irving, Texas. However, some say the Alcotest 9510 was not tailored to the Commonwealth's regulations and was not operating correctly during some tests. In fact, the state's Executive Office of Public Safety and Security said that some breathalyzer machines were never programmed with the accurate calibration settings for the state. On the other side of the story, a small number of breath tests conducted by law enforcement on suspected drunk drivers were not accurate because of mistakes made by the arresting officer and not because the machines were not working properly. Does the truth lie somewhere in the middle? You need to ask a knowledgeable criminal defense attorney.

Meanwhile, over 500 defendants have joined a consolidated case that is being heard in Concord District Court that challenges the reliability of the breathalyzer test and seeks to exclude blood-alcohol readings from the drunk driving cases involed. Furthermore, hundreds of drunk driving cases in Massachusetts have been put on hold as a judge prepares to rule on whether the evidence produced by Alcotest 9510 is sound and admissible in court.

The verdict is now out in this ever-changing saga of the faulty breathalyzer tests. Recently, Judge Robert Brennan, Justice of the District Court, gave his ruling in this matter. "Accordingly, the Court DENIES the consolidated defendants’ Motion to Exclude Breath Alcohol Content Percentage Results Using the Alcotest 9510 and Any Opinion Testimony for any breathalyzer results from a machine calibrated and certified after September 14, 2014, but ALLOWS the motion as to any results produced by a device calibrated and certified between June of 2012 and September 14, 2014, subject to the possibility of a case-by-case demonstration of the reliability of OAT’s calibration of a particular device to a trial judge in the court in which the Commonwealth seeks to offer the result as evidence." (COMMONWEALTH v. EVANDO ANANIAS, CHRISTIAN FIGUEROA, AND OTHERS)

In his 33-page decision, Judge Brennan, ruled that the between June 2012 and September 14, 2014 the Alcotest 9510 did not produce scientifically reliable blood-alcohol readings in the Commonwealth. This is a victory for those whose drunk and driving arrests occurred prior to September 14, 2014 but a crushing defeat for those whose arrests took place after this date. The evidence revealed from Alcotest 9510 could be included in your court case.

If you want to know how this recent ruling will affect your pending OUI/DUI case in Massachusetts consult a criminal defense attorney. An OUI/DUI conviction can have devastating effects on your professional and personal life. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney, Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case.  Contact Attorney, Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

 

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What is an Expungement?

A criminal conviction can create havoc in your life. It may make it difficult to find a job, rent an apartment, go back to school, or adopt or foster a child. Your criminal history can lead people to shun you. However, there are ways to have an arrest or conviction erased from your history in some cases. Everyone deserves a second chance.

This is done by way of an expungement. Although law enforcement may have possession of your criminal record, an expungement will keep the information out of the public eye. Therefore, schools, employers, or landlords will not be privy to the information in your criminal background. After the expungement process is final, you do not have to disclose the conviction or arrest on a job or apartment application. The information is sealed from the public, and there is no reason for you to disclose it.

You need to speak with a criminal defense attorney who can determine if an expungement can apply to your particular case. Each jurisdiction has its own expungement restrictions. In the Commonwealth, there are many factors to determine if an individual is eligible for expungement. They may include:

  • The passage of time since the arrest or conviction of the crime or misdeed

  • The seriousness and nature of the crime committed

  • The perpetrator’s overall criminal record, background, or history

Many times, arrests or convictions made during the teen years can be expunged, but more serious crimes committed in adulthood may not be easy to erase. Your attorney can let you know if you qualify for an expungement. While the expungement process varies, it typically involves filing an application or petition for an expungement. A criminal defense attorney can help you understand the various forms necessary to start the process and explain their importance to your case. The forms needed for an expungement may include the following:

  • Certificate of eligibility

  • Petition to expunge your records

  • Acceptance of service

  • A Prosecutor and victim statement

  • A victim checklist

  • Consent and waiver of hearing

  • Petitioner's reply

  • Findings of fact and conclusions law

After the court grants a petition or application, it will award an order of expungement that will be served to other organizations to ensure that any records in their files about you are sealed or removed. These organizations may include:

  • The police department or sheriff's office of your city

  • The county jail in your area

  • The state's department of corrections (prisons)

In short, no record of an expunged arrest or conviction will appear should someone search your criminal record. An expungement is like giving yourself a second chance in life, clearing your criminal record, and starting over again.

A criminal record or background can have a negative impact on your life and future. If you are considering an expungement of your criminal record, you should speak with a knowledgeable criminal defense attorney to see if your situation qualifies for an expungement. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney, Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice about an expungement. He can help you navigate the process and file the proper paperwork and documents to get the process started. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case. Contact Attorney, Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

 

Reckless Driving

Young drivers or even adults who think reckless driving and racing cars on the roadway is fun and exciting should think twice. Law enforcement views it as a siginifcant offense that carries severe consequences.

Reckless driving is a serious offense that involves moving violations or actions by drivers that endanger the safety of others on the road. It goes beyond just carelessly or improperly driving a vehicle. It is considered a major moving traffic violation.  If you are charged with reckless driving, you should call a criminal defense attorney immediately to discuss your legal options.

There is a difference between careless driving and reckless driving. Careless driving is considered to be driving a vehicle without caution. An example of careless driving could be not using a turn signal or failing to stop at a red traffic light or sign. Reckless driving entails more.

Reckless driving is often seen as an intentional mental state to disregard the rules of the highway. A driver fails to abide by common driving procedures and use common sense. Driving recklessly shows a disregard for human life or property while you are operating a vehicle. It is sometimes called negligent operation of a vehicle or driving to endanger. There are many different circumstances that may result in a reckless driving charge, which may include:

  • Speeding

  • Driving too slowly

  • Being distracted via phone, text messages, or social media tools

  • Creating your own lane

  • Drag racing

  • Driving the wrong way down a one-way street

  • Operating a vehicle with an obstructive view

  • Making an unauthorized pass in a no-pass zone

  • Going to sleep while driving

  • Making unsafe vehicle movements

  • Driving actions that result in injury or an accident

  • Cutting off other motorists on the highway

  • Traveling excessive speeds between 90 and more

  • Operating a vehicle at night without using lights

  • Driving too closely behind another vehicle (tailgating)

According to Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. ch. 90, § 24, a reckless or negligent operation conviction can be harsh in the Commonwealth. You can receive two weeks to two years in jail or pay fines up to $200. Any driver convicted of a reckless or negligent driving office will face a discretionary license suspension. A first offense carries a 60-day suspension. A second offense within three years will result in a minimum one-year loss of license. Massachusetts has incorporated a Safe Driver Insurance Program, which may reward you for a good driving record or punish you for a bad one. A reckless driving violation will cause drivers to automatically face increases in their driver's insurance for up to three years.

If you have been accused or charged with negligent or reckless driving, you should immediately consult a criminal defense attorney. The consequences can be devastating and may include jail, prison, and huge fines. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney, Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case. Contact Attorney, Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

 

False Imprisonment

False imprisonment is an intentional confinement of someone without his or her consent or the legal authority to confine someone. False imprisonment or unlawful restraint charges are considered quite serious in a court of law. Even when you think you are justified for committing the false imprisonment of an individual, an arrest or charge can have detrimental effects on you, and you need to speak with an experienced criminal defense attorney. In most cases, to be convicted of this crime, a prosecutor must show the following:

 

  • The perpetrator intended to confine a person within established boundaries

  • The victim did not consent to the confined

  • The confinement was unlawful

 

Depending on the severity of the crime, a false imprisonment charge can be prosecuted as a misdemeanor or a felony. The victim, who has experienced false imprisonment, can also seek civil claims for damages. Punishment for being found guilty of this crime may include probation, fines, jail, or prison. A criminal defense attorney can help you create a defense for your case.

If someone mistakenly locks you in a closet not knowing you are inside and you are left in the closet overnight, this does not constitute false imprisonment, just an unfortunate accident. However, if your boss willfully pushed you into the office closet, locked the door, cut off the lights, and left you there all night as punishment for not making your monthly sales quota, then that would be an example of false imprisonment. You have a legal case and should find an attorney to explain your rights. Also, in the workplace, if your boss threats or detains you longer than normal, it may also be viewed as a case of false imprisonment.

Adults are not the only ones who can be a victim of false imprisonment. Children are often the targets of false imprisonment. False imprisonment of a minor happens when the detainee is younger than the age of adulthood. In most states, this is under 18 years of age. False imprisonment of a child or minor is a serious crime and is punished more harshly than if the victim was an adult. Other examples of false imprisonment may include:

  • Holding or restraining a person in a manner that limits his or her freedom

  • Grabbing an individual without his or her consent

  • Keeping someone detained for an unreasonable amount of time

  • A law enforcement officer or a security guard holding a person beyond the normal amount of time necessary

  • Confining someone to a room without his or her consent

If you have been accused or charged with false imprisonment (unlawful restraint) of an individual, you should immediately consult a criminal defense attorney. The consequences can be devastating and may include jail or prison time and hefty fines. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney, Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case.  Contact Attorney, Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

 

 

Drugs and School Zone Statutes

 

In Massachusetts, if you are convicted of a drug offense within a school zone, playground, or public park, you could face stiff punishment and even prison time. This legislation, known as the "School Zone" statute, is designed to keep the environment around children drug-free and reduce drug possession in public schools, parks, and playgrounds. The school zone statute and other drug laws in the Commonwealth can be difficult to understand to the average person. You should consult with an experienced criminal defense attorney if you need immediate legal advice.

According to Massachusetts General Law,

"Any person who violates the provisions of [G. L.c. 94C, §§ 32, 32A-32F, or 32I,] while in or on, or within 300 feet of the real property comprising a public or private accredited preschool, accredited headstart facility, elementary, vocational, or secondary school if the violation occurs between [5 A.M.] and midnight, whether or not in session, or within one hundred feet of a public park or playground shall be punished by a term of imprisonment in the state prison for not less than two and one-half nor more than fifteen years or by imprisonment in a jail or house of correction for not less than two nor more than two and one-half years. No sentence imposed under the provisions of this section shall be for less than a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment of two years. A fine of not less than [$1,000] nor more than [$10,000] may be imposed but not in lieu of the mandatory minimum two year term of imprisonment as established herein. In accordance with the provisions of [G. L. c. 279, § 8A,] such sentence shall begin from and after the expiration of the sentence for violation of [the predicate offense]. Lack of knowledge of school boundaries shall not be a defense to any person who violates the provisions of this section."

This law was created by the Massachusetts legislature in response to public outcry that more should be done to protect children from drugs. While some people support the law, others believe that it may be unfair and violate a person's due process rights. Some opponents of the law say it could unfairly punish innocent people who may not be drug users, recreational drug users utilizing less than one ounce of marijuana, or individuals who may find themselves in a situation in which they possess a controlled substance within 300 feet of a school or 100 feet of a public park by chance and not by design or purpose to sell or distribute drugs in a school zone.

The law carries severe mandatory minimum jail sentences that can result in up to 15 years in state prison. A conviction will carry a mandatory minimum prison sentence of two years behind bars. If you have been accused or charged with a school zone drug violation you should speak with a well-versed criminal defense attorney who can help protect your rights and create an effective defense strategy for your case.

If you are arrested for selling or distributing over an ounce of marijuana to a family member or friend for personal or recreational use within 300 feet of a school in Massachusetts you can face a mandatory jail sentence under this legislation. Mandatory means that your sentence will not be lowered and you must serve some time in jail. The Commonwealth takes drug offenses very seriously.

If you have been accused or charged with a drug offense or a school zone violation involving drugs, you should immediately consult a criminal defense attorney. The consequences can be devastating and may include jail or prison time and hefty fines. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case. Contact Attorney, Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

 

 

Do Not Hit and Run

18-year-old Billy was racing home in his car in an attempt to beat his dad to the house. Billy stayed out past his curfew of 12:30 am. In the process of speeding, he sideswiped a car and kept going without stopping. His main focus at the time was jumping into bed to appear he was at home sleeping before his dad got off work.

Billy did beat his dad home, but Billy worried all night regarding his misdeed. He had nightmares of jail time because of his reckless and irresponsible behavior. Billy should be worried, he committed a "Hit and Run." Due to his actions, Billy may not only be in big trouble with his dad, but also with the law.

"Hit and Run," or leaving the scene of a car accident without leaving your contact or insurance information, can become a serious crime. Depending on the situation, it can result in a simple traffic ticket or a felony charge. The punishment will depend on the nature of the case, whether you destroyed personal property or caused human injury, suffering, or death. The punishment usually increases when personal injury or death occurs. In any case, you should contact a criminal defense attorney immediately and discuss your legal options.

In the Commonwealth, failure to stop after a car collision, not exchanging insurance information, or refusing to call the local police is considered a misdemeanor under MGL c. 90 s. 24. The crime of leaving the scene involving property damage may include the following penalties if you are convicted.

  • A $200 fine

  • A 60-day to one-year loss of license

  • A two-year jail sentence

To be convicted of this crime, it must be proven that you knew about the property damage or accident when you left the scene of the crime. Leaving the scene of an accident involving personal injury may carry harsher penalties for those convicted. The punishment may include:

  • A jail sentence of six months to two years

  • A fine of $500 - $1,000

  • Loss of license for a minimum of one year and up to an indefinite amount of time

If you are convicted a second time for leaving the scene of an accident involving personal injury, the penalties will include a loss of license for a minimum of two years. Leaving the scene of an accident involving a personal injury resulting in death is a felony in the Commonwealth, and you will be required to serve a mandatory minimum of one year in jail.

Leaving the scene of an accident with personal injury resulting in death is a very serious crime.  You need to hire a skilled criminal defense attorney, who knows the law and appropriate defenses for such cases. Punishment for leaving the scene of an accident with a personal injury resulting in death may include:

  • A loss of license for a minimum of three years and up to an indefinite amount of time

  • Fines between $1,000 and $5000

  • A minimum of one year in jail and up to 10 years in prison

If you have been accused or charged with "hit and run" or leaving the scene of an accident, you should immediately consult a criminal defense attorney. The consequences can be devastating and may include jail time, license suspension, and fines. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney, Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case.  Contact Attorney, Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

 

Vehicular Manslaughter

Vehicular manslaughter is a crime that is committed by a driver who unintentionally causes an accident that results in the death of someone else. It can include the death of a passenger, driver, or pedestrian who was accidentally killed by the actions of a reckless driver. A person other than the driver of the car can be charged with vehicular manslaughter, as well. If you are charged with this crime, you should contact a criminal defense attorney immediately to learn your legal options and defenses. You can be charged with vehicular manslaughter for the following reasons:

  • Driving under the influence or alcohol or drugs: Causing a fatal accident while driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs can lead to a vehicular manslaughter charge. Intoxication can be proven through chemical evidence (blood, breath or urine tests) and other incriminating facts.

  • Being a careless or negligent driver: Negligent driving may include texting or talking on a cell phone while driving. If a driver takes his or her eyes of the highway while reaching to turn on the radio or rolling up a car window and causes a fatal accident, he or she may be charged with vehicular manslaughter.

  • Violating a safety statute: You can be charged with vehicular manslaughter when you violate a safety stature. If you perform an illegal U-turn or pass another vehicle while driving through a no passing zone and accidentally kill someone, you may be charged with vehicular manslaughter.

In the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you can be charged with motor vehicle homicide or manslaughter by motor vehicle. The charges for motor vehicle homicide can be a misdemeanor or felony. It depends on many factors, such as if the driver was impaired by drugs or alcohol. For any motor vehicle homicide conviction in the Commonwealth, you could lose your license for up to 15 years. If you had a prior OUI conviction, your license could be suspended for life. The punishment for motor vehicle homicide is outlined in MGL Chapter 90, Section 24G.

You can face a stiffer punishment if you are charged with manslaughter by motor vehicle, which is manslaughter while operating a motor vehicle in Massachusetts. According to Massachusetts Law Chapter 265-131/2, if you are convicted, penalties may include:

  • A mandatory minimum of five years in jail

  • A maximum of five to 20 years in prison

  • Fines up to $25,000

  • 15-year loss of driver's license

If you have been accused or charged with motor vehicle homicide or manslaughter by motor vehicle, you should immediately consult a criminal defense attorney. The consequences can be devastating and may include prison time, license suspension, and fines. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney, Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case. Contact Attorney, Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

 

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Holiday Blues and OUI/DWI Arrests

The holiday season is a time for parties and celebrations with family or friends. One sure way to dampen the holiday spirit is for you to be charged or accused of an OUI/DWI (operating under the influence of alcohol or driving while intoxicated). This will zap the jolly out of the holiday season for you and the friend or family member who has to stop by the police station and get you out of jail. An OUI/DWI arrest is a real party pooper for everyone involved. Your first phone call should be to a criminal defense attorney who can provide you with legal advice and solutions to lessen your charges.

Often times OUI/DWI arrests increase during the holiday season as many law enforcement agencies are on high alert to find impaired drivers who are making the holiday travel season unsafe. The warning signs that may signal to a police officer that you are drinking and driving may include:

  • Driving too fast (speeding)

  • Driving too slow

  • Failing to stop at a stoplight or stopsign

  • Failing to yield

  • Driving erratically

  • Swerving and crossing lanes

Police officers can stop any motorist when they feel there is reasonable suspicion of driving while impaired or involvement in criminal activity. During the holiday season, police officers may conduct DUI checkpoints. DUI checkpoints are often referred to as a DUI roadblock or a sobriety checkpoint. DUI checkpoints are specific locales or streets by which police officers set up a roadblock to check motorists for signs of alcohol or drug usage.

DUI checkpoints are designed to ensure that the roads are safe for motorists and free of drunk drivers. While the practice is common, it is not legal in every state. However, Massachusetts is one of the states that makes it lawful to conduct DUI checkpoints. DUI checkpoints in the Commonwealth can be performed throughout the year.

After a police officer suspects you of operating a vehicle while impaired or under the influence of alcohol, he or she will usually ask you to perform a series of tests called field sobriety tests. These tests may include standing on one leg, walking a straight line, or speaking a few sentences to test abnormalities in your speech patterns. The police officer will check your eyes to determine pupil dilation.

If you fail the field sobriety tests, the officer will probably take you to the police station and ask you to participate in chemical blood alcohol level tests. These tests can be conducted by testing your blood, urine, or breath (breathalyzer). If you test above a .08% blood alcohol level, you will be charged with an OUI/DWI.

You can refuse to take a chemical blood alcohol level test. Your refusal can work against you sometimes, as a refusal of the test can invoke an implied consent statute. This automatically causes a suspension of your driver's license for a period of time.

In Massachusetts, a refusal to take a chemical blood alcohol level test will result in a six-month automatic license suspension. However, a refusal cannot be used to insinuate guilt in an OUI/DWI case. When you refuse to submit to a chemical blood alcohol level test after three prior DUI offenses, your license will be suspended for life.

If you have been accused or charged with an OUI/DWI, you should immediately consult a criminal defense attorney. The consequences can be devastating and may include jail time, license suspension, and fines. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney, Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case.  Contact Attorney, Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

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The Link Between Disorderly Conduct and Indecent Exposure

Disorderly conduct (disturbing the peace) may seem like a simple and common act in the eyes of many people. It happens almost every day. However, in Massachusetts, you could face serious legal consequences if you are charged with disorderly conduct. When charged with disorderly conduct, you should speak with a criminal defense attorney who can explain the severe outcomes possible and help you understand your legal rights. In Massachusetts, the law defines a disorderly person as an individual whose actions cause alarm, annoyance, or inconvenience to the general public. These actions may include:

  • Fighting in public

  • Threatening behavior

  • Violent actions

  • Orchestrating a hazardous or offensive situation

In Massachusetts, the link between disorderly conduct and indecent exposure is outlined in Massachusetts Law Section 53. Both of these crimes are punishable under this statute. In both cases one can serve time in jail up to six months. They are each misdemeanor offenses.

Indecent exposure can range from urinating in public, displaying various forms of nudity, minor sexual acts, to open and gross lewdness. It is a deliberate exposure of private parts, such as one's buttocks, genitalia, or female breasts. To be convicted of indecent exposure, it must be proved that the defendant performed one of the following lewd acts:

  • Exposing their buttocks, genitals, or female breast to others

  • Intentionally exposing these private parts to others

  • Openly exposing private parts with the intent of revealing them to unwilling members of the public

  • Exposing oneself to create a distress or shock reaction

  • Succeeding in creating a shock or distress due to exposing one's private parts

However, indecent exposure can become more severe when it involves open and gross lewdness and lascivious behavior. Committing this form of indecent exposure is a felony offense. Open and gross lewdness and lascivious behaviors are prohibited and discussed in Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 272 Section 16. If you are convicted of this crime, you could serve time in the state prison for up to three years or jail time for up to two years and pay a fine.

This Massachusetts law was created to punish individuals who intentionally and openly participate in or showcase lewd sexual acts on unwilling people or the public.  The law does not apply to sexual expressions that may take place in an environment considered private. If a nosy neighbor peeks through your window to watch you and your spouse perform lewd and lascivious sexual acts in the privacy of your home, you will not be in violation of this law. However, if you display your bizarre fetish involving lewd and lascivious sexual acts on the front lawn or rooftop for everyone to see, you could not only shock your neighbors but also be charged with open and gross lewdness and lascivious behavior.

If you have been accused of disorderly conduct or a crime involving indecent exposure, it cannot only be embarrassing but also, it can have severe consequences on your life. You should contact a criminal defense attorney to explore your legal options. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney, Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case.  Contact Attorney, Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

Crimes Involving Guns

Guns are often used in a variety of crimes. Many times, these guns are obtained illegally or stolen. If you have been charged with a crime involving a gun you need to speak with a reliable criminal defense attorney who can explain your legal options.

Massachusetts gun owners are required by law to report the loss, theft, or recovery of a gun to the Department of Criminal Justice Information Services and the licensing authority in the city of the owner's residence. A failure to make the appropriate report of loss or theft of the firearm can result in the suspension or permanent revocation of the owner's Firearm Identification Card or license to carry firearms in the Commonwealth.

Many times the guns that are stolen from everyday citizens are used to commit crimes in the community. Crimes involving guns may include the criminal possession of a gun. A possession of a gun may become illegal when:

  • The weapon of possession is illegal

  • A person is not allowed to possess a weapon

  • An individual carries a weapon in a particular area that prohibits firearms

It is illegal to possess a gun in a no-weapons zone, in a courthouse or other areas deemed illegal to carry a gun. Crimes involving a possession of a gun may include:

  • Carjacking with a deadly weapon

  • Battery with a deadly weapon

  • Armed robbery

Individuals who commit a crime utilizing a gun will make the incident more serious, resulting in a harsher penalty. A well-versed criminal defense attorney can discuss the possible outcomes and consequences of your case. Often a misdemeanor charge will become a felony charge if a gun is used to perpetrate the crime. Simple assault is often viewed as a misdemeanor with a lighter sentence, but assault with a deadly weapon will become a felony with harsher penalties and a longer jail sentence. Persons who usually cannot possess a gun include:

  • Minors

  • Mentally ill persons

  • Individuals with a felony conviction

  • Fugitives fleeing the law or justice

  • Illegal or unlawful aliens

There are many federal gun laws that have stiff penalties for crimes involving guns. You can serve up to 10 years for making a false statement to obtain a firearm. You can get up to five years in prison for carrying a gun inside a school zone. If you steal a firearm, ammunition, or explosives, you could face up to 10 years in prison. If you use or carry a firearm during the commission of a felony, your punishment could be five years to life in prison. In some cases, if a death occurred during the commission of a crime involving a firearm, you could receive the death penalty.

Crimes involving guns can have serious consequences and you may lose many of your rights and privileges if convicted. If you have been accused of crime involving a gun, you should immediately consult a criminal defense attorney. The outcomes can be devastating and may include significant jail or prison time and fines. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney, Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case. Contact Attorney, Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

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