Massachusetts Legal Developments Blog

Massachusetts Legal Developments Blog

Mail Theft is a Serious Offense

 

You may not be the only one waiting for your mailman to deliver your mail each day. Mail thieves are looking out for the mailman and waiting to steal your mail, too. The United States Postal service handles millions of pieces of mail each day. This high volume of mail gives thieves the opportunity to steal millions of pieces of mail each day, too. Mail theft is a serious offense. If you have been charged with mail theft, you should contact a criminal defense attorney.

Reasons for Stealing Mail

Mail theft happens when an individual steals mail that does not belong to him or her. These unscrupulous persons steal mail for a variety of reasons that may include:

  • Credit Card Applications

  • Checks or Money orders

  • Banks Statements

  • Prescription drugs

  • Personal Identifying Information

How Thieves Steal Mail

Thieves steal from postal collection boxes, apartment mailbox panels, or neighborhood delivery and collection boxes at residences. Thieves often pry open mailboxes inside the lobby of post offices and multiple-slot postal lock boxes in neighborhoods. Thieves may break into a postal delivery truck to counterfeit postal-box keys or steal mail that has not been delivered.

Protecting Yourself from Mail Theft

The United States Postal Service recommends that people make it more difficult for thieves to steal their mail and offer the following suggestions:

  • Do not send cash through the mail

  • Immediately remove delivered mail from your mailbox

  • Ask a neighbor to pick up your mail when you are on vacation

  • Request the post office to hold your mail when you are away for a long time

  • Deposit mail in a mail slot at your local post office

  • Start a community watch program in your neighborhood

Punishment for Mail Theft

Because the United States Postal Service is a federal agency, mail theft is considered a federal crime. According to the United States Code 18 Section 1708, federal mail theft is a felony. Being charged with stealing mail could land you in federal prison for up to five years and cause you to pay a fine up to $250,000. If you have been charged with mail theft, you should contact a criminal defense attorney who can create a solid defense.

In addition, you could face other charges depending on the nature of the theft. If personal identifying information was stolen and utilized, the perpetrator could face an identity theft conviction. Personal identifying information may include the following:

  • Credit Card Account Information

  • Social Security Numbers

  • Tax Identification Numbers

  • Driver's license numbers

  • Bank Account Information

  • Date of Birth

  • Addresses and Telephone Numbers

  • Employee or School ID Numbers

  • Passport Identification Information

Legal Help for Mail Theft Accusations

If you are charged with mail theft, you need to contact a criminal defense attorney. The consequences can be devastating and costly. Plus, you could face federal prison time for your actions. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case. Contact Attorney Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

Serious Firearm Charges Hinge on Illegal Search

According to the Boston Police twitter feed:

  • At about 3:43 pm on Tuesday, June 20, 2017, members of the Youth Violence Strike Force . . . observed a black motor vehicle operating . . . make several illegal turns . . . . [O]fficers stopped the car [and] . . . recognized two of the occupants from previous interactions. Fearing the presence of weapons, officers instructed all occupants to exit the car. As the rear occupant was exiting the vehicle, officers observed a firearm on the floor near his feet.

From the recovery of this one firearm the police generate six charges and two arrests, none of which should be allowed to stand up in court. 

Why did the police ask the driver and passenger to exit the vehicle?  Because they "recognized two of the occupants from previous interactions." 

Under Article XIV of the Massachusetts Declaration of Rights, exit orders during routine, lawful stops for ordinary traffic violations must be justified by reasonable articulable suspicion that the officer's safety, or the safety of others, is in danger.  In 1997 the Supreme Judicial Court held that "a routine traffic stop must end on the production of a valid license and registration unless the police have grounds for inferring that 'either the operator or his passengers were involved in the commission of a crime . . . or engaged in other suspicious conduct.'”

The only evidence the police had here was that the driver failed to signal a few turns.  That's not reasonable suspicion as to anything criminal, and for certain not a reason to tell the occupants to exit the vehicle.  Plain and simple, the officers' order that the vehicle's occupants get out was illegal, the firearm should be suppressed, and the defendants should be sent home.

 

 

 

Obstruction of Justice is a Crime

The phrase "obstruction of justice" is making headlines across the national media, as legal experts and political commentators continue to debate over whether or not key U.S. Government officials are allegedly involved in obstruction of justice surrounding the firing of an FBI director in the middle of a government investigation. While the legal community and a criminal defense attorney may be familiar with the phrase, many everyday people want to know what the term means.

Definition of Obstruction of Justice

Obstruction of justice is a crime that involves interfering with criminal procedures related to the administration and due process of the law. An individual can be found guilty of obstruction of justice when he or she intentionally tries to impede or affect an investigation with a goal to cover up evidence or guilt. It is a serious crime to knowingly or willfully stand in the way of a criminal investigation or prosecution.

Lying to Law Enforcement

Intentionally making untrue statements to a federal law enforcement agent during an investigation is considered obstruction of justice, and it is also a felony. One could face a long prison sentence for lying to a federal agent.

Hiding or Destroying Evidence

If you intentionally hide or destroy evidence in an effort to stop an investigation, you have committed obstruction of justice. When you hide, change or destroy any documents, records or other evidence during an investigation, you may face several years in prison.

Common Law Obstruction

Common law obstruction involves interfering with a criminal investigation. This act will punish individuals who intentionally try to influence or stop an investigation. One can be charged with common law obstruction if he or she tries to persuade a witness not to testify. You can be charged with this crime even when it does not involve witness intimidation.

In Massachusetts, obstruction of justice is a common law crime, which means the elements of the crime is not set by a certain statute and can be changed to fit the particular crime committed. In order for a person to be convicted of obstruction of justice, the prosecution must prove the following elements:

  • The defendant knowingly attempts to interfere with an investigation.

  • The defendant was aware an investigation was taking place.

  • The defendant intentionally tried to persuade or advise a witness to lie, destroy, hide, or change evidence in an investigation.

  • An alleged crime was being investigated by law enforcement officials.

Punishment for Obstruction of Justice

According to, 18 U.S.C. § 1519 - U.S. Code, "Whoever knowingly alters, destroys, mutilates, conceals, covers up, falsifies, or makes a false entry in any record, document, or tangible object with the intent to impede, obstruct, or influence the investigation or proper administration of any matter within the jurisdiction of any department or agency of the United States or any case filed under title 11, or in relation to or contemplation of any such matter or case, shall be fined under this title, imprisoned not more than 20 years, or both."

If you are charged with obstruction of justice, you need to contact a criminal defense attorney. The consequences can be devastating and include years in prison. Your attorney can explain your rights and create a defense to help your case. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney, Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case. Contact Attorney, Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

 

Resisting Arrest

If you are thinking of trying to avoid being arrested by a police officer and take matters into your own hands, you should think again. You may be charged with resisting an arrest, and the consequences of your actions may not be pretty.

When you are being arrested for a violation, it is always best to cooporate with the arresting officer, even when you feel you are innocent, and not try to fight or resist the officer. You will only get yourself in further trouble. When you are arrested for any violation, you should contact a reliable criminal defense attorney who will fight your legal battles in court. Let your attorney do the fighting, and you are more likely to win your case, especially if you have been wrongly accused of a crime you did not commit.

Types of Charges for Resisting Arrest

In the Commonwealth, an offender can be charged with either a misdemeanor resisting arrest or felony resisting arrest charge. One is more serious than the other. A misdemeanor resisting arrest charge may include trying to escape or flee from an arresting police officer, challenging the authority of the police officer, or using profanity in your conversation with law enforcement.

On the other hand, a felony resisting police charge involves the use of threat or violence against a police officer during the arrest encounter. A felony resisting police charge puts the life of the police officer in harm or jeopardy.

Factors for a Resisting Arrest Conviction

  • To be charged with resisting arrest, the prosecution must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the following happened:

  • The defendant prevented or attempted to prevent the police officer from completing the arrest.

  • The police officer was conducting the arrest while acting under their official authority and duty.

  • The defendant's actions of resistance involved the use of force, threat, violence or physical force against law enforcement.

  • The defendant's resistance created a risk of harm or bodily injury to the officer.

  • The defendant willfully carried out these actions to avoid arrest.

Legal Procedures During an Arrest

When an individual is arrested, the police officer must follow a variety of legal procedures during and after the arrest. During an arrest, you become a suspect, taken into custody, and are not allowed to walk away from the arresting police officer. When you are stopped by law enforcement, they may frisk you with a pat-down of your outer garments to see if you are carrying any dangerous weapons. After your arrest, they will conduct a comprehensive search of your personage. Law enforcement can confiscate your personal money or property. Once you are arrested, you will be booked. At this time, the police officer will ask for personal information, such as your address and birthday. You will be fingerprinted and photographed.

If you are charged with resisting an arrest by a police officer, you need to contact a criminal defense attorney. The consequences can be devastating and costly. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney, Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case. Contact Attorney, Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

Ransomware Attacks

The computers of many businesses around the globe were paralyzed and held hostage by the recent outbreak of WannaCry Ransom. The attack is considered to be the largest ransomware attack affecting the Internet by freezing hospitals and other firms out of critical data. With ransomware, hackers lock up a computer and demand money from the user or company. If one does not comply, they may lose sensitive or important data forever.

Any person or company can become a victim of ransomware and other forms of cybercrimes. If you are charged or arrested for committing a cybercrime, you need to speak with a criminal defense attorney immediately because the outcomes of a conviction can be life-changing. There are many types of ransomware, which may include:

  • Scareware: The use of bogus security software and tech support fraud to scam people. An individual may receive a pop-up message stating that dangerous malware was detected in their system and they should pay money to get rid of it. Scareware may appear as legitimate antivirus programs and fool many people.

  • Screen Locker: A lock screen ransomware will freeze out your computer completely. Hackers will display a bogus FBI or US. Department of Justice seal suggesting that your computer has been involved in illegal activities and require you to pay a fine. The FBI of DOJ will only use legal methods to notify a person of illegal activity, and would not freeze a person out of their computer or demand payment.

  • Encrypting Ransomware: Hackers will steal your files, encrypt them, and demand a payment to decrypt and send them back.

Although cybercrime is a new and growing crime, Massachusetts is taking the problem seriously. The Commonwealth is aggressively punishing those who violate the law. The Commonwealth is involved in a Cyber Crime Division with the Attorney General's Office. The Cyber Crime Division is charged with investigating and prosecuting individuals involved in cybercrimes. Cybercrimes may involve business-related crimes, such as ransomware and hacking to other cybercrimes such as child exploitation, human trafficking, illegal file sharing, fraud, and other computer-related violations.

Punishment for Committing Cybercrimes in MA

In the Commonwealth, cybercrimes are punishable under M.G.L. c. 265, s. 43 and considered to be a form of stalking. The law prohibits stalking, and it can be further defined as acts or threats performed by phone, mail, fax machine, emails, or internet correspondences. If convicted, you could face years in prison.

Section 43." (a) Whoever (1) willfully and maliciously engages in a knowing pattern of conduct or series of acts over a period of time directed at a specific person which seriously alarms or annoys that person and would cause a reasonable person to suffer substantial emotional distress, and (2) makes a threat with the intent to place the person in imminent fear of death or bodily injury, shall be guilty of the crime of stalking and shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not more than 5 years or by a fine of not more than $1,000, or imprisonment in the house of correction for not more than 21/2 years or by both such fine and imprisonment. The conduct, acts or threats described in this subsection shall include, but not be limited to, conduct, acts or threats conducted by mail or by use of a telephonic or telecommunication device or electronic communication device including, but not limited to, any device that transfers signs, signals, writing, images, sounds, data, or intelligence of any nature transmitted in whole or in part by a wire, radio, electromagnetic, photo-electronic or photo-optical system, including, but not limited to, electronic mail, internet communications, instant messages or facsimile communications."

If you are charged with ransomware or other forms of cybercrime, you need to contact a criminal defense attorney. The consequences can be devastating and costly. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney, Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case. Contact Attorney, Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

Drunk Driving Accidents and Arrests

With the winter months behind us in the Commonwealth and warmer weather approaching, more folks will be coming out of hibernation to enjoy the spring and summer weather in Massachusetts. Spring and summer means more people will be on the road, and also that the chances of being involved in a drinking and driving accident increase significantly.

What Should You do After a Car Accident with a Drunk Driver?

If you have been in an accident, make sure you are physically safe and out of danger. If your car can be moved, drive it to the shoulder of the highway. If you are hurt, take care of any wounds or injuries. Call 911 to get medical help, if necessary.

If the other driver is coherent, get his or her insurance, license plate number, and other personal information. If other people witnessed the accident, ask for their contact information. If you are injured in the accident or the other driver is intoxicated, call your local law enforcement immediately.

Collect and save evidence by taking pictures of your injuries and damage to the cars involved in the accident. Contact a reliable attorney who can explain your legal options.

What Should You do if You are Pulled Over for Drunk and Driving?

If your are being pulled over by a police officer while driving, drive your car off the road and and to a safe stopping location. One of the first things the arresting officer will do is observe your behavior and actions. Your behavior will be documented in his or her report, which may impact your case. The officer will make a mental note of how you drove your car off the road. If you are driving erratically, it will be noted on the police report.

Officers are trained to be aware of their surroundings to keep themselves safe. They will usually approach a vehicle from behind to have a clear view. They will be closely watching you. Therefore, make sure you do not make any sudden or suspicious movements that will make them think you are dangerous. Keep your hands on the steering wheel at the 10 and 2 o'clock positions.

Always treat the officers with respect and follow their instructions without protest. If you are hostile and angry, the officers will likely put that in their report, and it will not look good for you. Plus, an impolite driver is more likely to be arrested. If a police officer asks you to step out of the car, you should comply with the request. If you avoid getting out of the car, you might be charged with resisting arrest.

Do not incriminate yourself. You do have to give your name, license, and registration to the police officer. However, you do not have to answer any potentially incriminating questions. You can tell the officer that you have been advised not to answer any questions without the presence of your attorney. Do not lie; honesty is always the best policy, especially in a situation like this.

In Massachusetts, the law requires you to take a breath or blood test when you are arrested for an OUI/DUI. The Commonwealth has an implied consent law, which means that if you refuse to submit to a chemical test, you will receive an automatic license suspension.

When you are released, you should try to remember everything that happened, so you can tell your attorney, and he or she can help you with a defense strategy. You need to recall where you were and what you were doing prior to the arrest. You need to note how much you had to drink and how long it was been prior to your arrest. You should remember what the arresting officer said and how he or she treated you during the incident. Remembering this information can greatly impact your case in court.

If you have been arrested for drunk driving or caused an accident while driving under the influence, you need to contact a criminal defense attorney. The consequences can be devastating and costly. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney, Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case. Contact Attorney Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

 

Understanding the Bail Process

When you are arrested for a crime, the police officer can give you a ticket with your signed pledge to appear in court on a certain day or the police officer can take you to jail. When you are put in jail, you will need to post bail to get out of jail. Bail is a temporary release of a person who is awaiting a court trial on the condition that he or she puts up money to ensure they will appear in court. If you have questions about bail, you need to contact a criminal defense attorney.

The court will set the amount of bail to be paid. Payments are usually made by cash, money order, or a cashier's check. A defendant can post his or her own bail or find another individual to post it on his or her behalf. Once bail has been posted, the court will issue a document or court order that allows the defendant to be released from jail.

Factors for setting a financial dollar amount for bail may vary depending on the nature of the charges or whether the crime involved brutality, revenge, or threats to public safety. A judge or magistrate will examine the defendant's past criminal background and all evidence against him or her. If a defendant is a major threat to society or has committed a serious crime, he or she may be held without bail. When a case ends with all obligations satisfied, the bond money is usually returned. However, in some cases, administrative costs may be deducted.

A well-versed criminal defense attorney  can help you understand the terms and penalties of the bail process. Furthermore, your attorney can plead your case in advance and help reduce bail. It is wise to connect with a criminal defense attorney at the start of your case so he or she can get your case ready for trial.

If the defendant does not have means to post his or her bail, he or she can seek the help of a bail bondsman or commercial bond agent, who acts as a surety for the bond. The agent posts bail after collecting a nonrefundable fee, usually 10 to 20%, from the defendant or from family or friends. When the defendant does not have money to give to the commercial bond agent as security, he or she can provide other types of collateral, such as jewelry, securities, or other items of value. Then, the bail bond agent agrees to pay the remaining amount to the court if the defendant does not appear in court.

Often a bail bond agent will require a defendant to stay in contact via phone or in person to ensure the defendant does not skip town to avoid appearing in court. In some cases, the defendant may be monitored or guarded to ensure an appearance in court. A bail bondsman is not required to post bail when he or she believes a defendant will not honor the obligations of the bond.

When an individual does not appear, a court can issue a bench warrant, which will forfeit any of the person's bail. A bench warrant will give law enforcement the authority to execute the warrant anytime. Also, the issuing of a bench warrant gives a bail agent the right to hire a bounty hunter to help find and capture a person in exchange for a portion of the bail forfeited to the court. The consequences of not appearing in court can be severe, including fines or imprisonment, or both.

If you want to learn more about setting bail and the bail process in your case, you need to contact a criminal defense attorney. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney, Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the bail or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case. Contact Attorney Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

 

Unlawful Possession of a Gun

Unless you fit certain exemptions outlined in MGL c. 269 s. 10, you can face a stiff penalty for knowingly possessing or knowingly having a firearm (loaded or unloaded) in your car. In the Commonwealth, you can face a mandatory minimum 18 months in jail or up to five years in state prison. If you have been charged with unlawful possession of a firearm, you should speak with a criminal defense attorney immediately about your case.

Massachusetts has the most regulated and strict laws in the nation concerning guns and firearms.  In fact, Massachusetts does not recognize gun permits from other states. Licensed gun owners in the Commonwealth have to be responsible gun owners who take gun laws and safety seriously while they exercise their right to carry.

In order to be convicted for the unlawful possession of a firearm, the prosecution must prove four factors beyond a reasonable doubt.

  • The prosecution must prove that you possessed the firearm on your personage (body) or inside your car.

  • The prosecution must prove that the weapon you possess is a firearm. Under Massachusetts law, a firearm is defined as a pistol, revolver, or another weapon, whether loaded or unloaded. The firearm must be capable of discharging a shot or bullet with a barrel length less than 16 inches. The prosecution must prove that these elements are a part of the definition of a firearm.

  • The prosecution must prove that you knowingly possessed a firearm, whether loaded or unloaded. If someone else placed the firearm in your car without your knowledge, you cannot be convicted.

  • The prosecution must prove you did not have a valid license to carry or did not have the required registration card to carry that firearm in the state of Massachusetts.

If you have been charged with the unlawful possession of a gun, whether loaded or unloaded, you need to speak with a knowledgeable criminal defense attorney who can create a defense strategy that can help your case.

M.G.L. c. 269, § 10(h) decrees that any individual who carries on his person or has under his control in a vehicle a loaded firearm while under the influence of intoxicating liquor, marijuana, narcotic drugs, depressants, or stimulant substances will face stiff penalties if convicted. A conviction for this offense is punishable with a fine up to $5,000 and imprisonment in a house of correction for up to two and a half years. You may be required to serve time and pay a fine. Gun charges in the Commonwealth are serious and can affect your ability to find employment or housing. When you are facing gun charges of any kind in Massachusetts, you need to seek legal advice immediately.

If you have been charged with unlawful possession of a gun or firearm, whether it is a loaded or unloaded gun, you need to contact a criminal defense attorney. The consequences can be devastating and life changing. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case. Contact Attorney Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

 

Massachusetts Traffic Laws and Violations

In the Commonwealth, there are many different types of traffic violations. Motorists need to stay up to speed on the various traffic violations and the penalties in case they are charged with breaking one of the many traffic laws. Some of offenses carry severe punishments that may have a negative impact on a defnedant’s driving record and cause a suspension of his or her driver's license, as well as an increase in his or her insurance premiums. If you are charged with a traffic violation, you should speak with a criminal defense attorney.

Some of the more common driving offenses in Massachusetts include:

  • Careless or reckless driving

  • Speeding (traveling over the posted speed limit)

  • Driving without a license

  • Driving without car insurance

  • Driving with a suspended, revoked, or expired driver's license

  • Failure to respect and obey a law enforcement official

  • Driving while impaired or under the influence of alcohol or drugs

Young drivers under the age of 18 may face different punishments for their traffic violations. In the Commonwealth, younger drivers are not permitted to carry passengers or operate a vehicle after certain hours. Young drivers who have a permit cannot drive without the presence of a licensed driver. If a driver carries passengers before the legal age to do so, he or she will face a 60-day license suspension and have to pay a license reinstatement fee. If a driver under 18 years old is caught speeding, he or she will face a 90-day license suspension and must pass a driver retraining course in addition to paying a license reinstatement fee. Young drivers caught using a cell phone will face a 60-day license suspension and a fine.

As a motorist in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you should know the laws and penalties you might face when you break a traffic law. Below, are traffic laws that motorists should know before they drive on the highways of the Commonwealth.

 

If you have been charged with a road or traffic violation, you need to speak with a criminal defense attorney. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case. Contact Attorney, Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

 

Speeding in a Construction Zone

You may believe that speeding in a construction zone at 2 am is okay when there are no construction workers around. You may think it is even fun to be a daredevil on the road. But you should think twice before speeding through a construction zone, with or without a crew present. The consequences can be devastating in both cases. You should contact a criminal defense attorney immediately to learn what you should do to reduce or eliminate the charges against you.

The penalties for speeding are significantly higher when they occur inside a construction or work zone. A moving violation fine for speeding in a construction zone is much greater than those for other moving violations. Construction zones may include:

  • Highway or roadway improvement projects

  • Public utility work or construction areas

  • City or state infrastructure enhancement projects

Under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 90 Section 17, a law enforcement official (local police officer or MA state trooper) can give a motorist a ticket for speeding in a construction zone or construction area. According to Chapter 90 Section 17, "Any person in violation of this section, while operating a motor vehicle through the parameters of a marked construction zone or construction area, at a speed which exceeds the posted limit, or at a speed that is greater than is reasonable and proper, shall be subject to a fine of 2 times the amount currently in effect for the violation issued." The officer may include additional surcharges to the amount you have to pay. Furthermore, if you are found guilty of speeding in a construction zone, your insurance will most likely increase.

The reason your insurance will go up is because speeding in a construction zone is considered a moving violation in the Commonwealth. Your citation will be viewed by the MA Registry of Motor Vehicles as a surchargeable occurrence resulting in additional points to your license. You will experience an increase in your insurance premiums for several years.

If you want to appeal your traffic ticket for speeding in a construction zone, you can appeal the traffic ticket in district court. Read the directions on the back of your ticket, and follow the directions carefully. When you request an appeal of your traffic ticket, you will receive a notice in the mail asking you to appear for a Civil Motor Vehicle Infractions (CMVI) Clerk Magistrate's Hearing. A criminal defense attorney can help you navigate the court system and appeal process. Your attorney can explain your legal rights, defenses, and legal options for your case.

If you have been charged with speeding in a construction zone, you need to speak with a criminal defense attorney. Boston Criminal Defense Attorney, Edward Molari can provide you with legal advice that may help reduce the punishment or lessen the charge. He cares about your situation and provides personalized legal services in every case. Contact Attorney, Edward Molari at 617-942-1532 for a free consultation.

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